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Harvard Business Review


Motivating through metrics
by Frederick F. Reichheld and Paul Rogers
Harvard Business Review 9/1/2005
Getting the right people on board - and then all enthusiastically pulling in the right direction - has bedeviled organizations since the time of wooden ships, when the most popular form of motivation left lash marks. Today's corporate helmsmen may be more enlightened, but they still face the same challenge. How can a company transform its frontline crew into a meritocracy that pulls together?

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.

The One Number You'll Need To Grow
by Frederick Reichheld
Harvard Business Review 12/1/03
Companies spend lots of time and money on complex tools to assess customer satisfaction. But they're measuring the wrong thing. The best predictor of top-line growth can usually be captured in a single survey question: Would you recommend this company to a friend?

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.

Lead for Loyalty
by Frederick Reichheld
Harvard Business Review 7/1/01
Use six bedrock principles to generate intense loyalty among your customers, employees, and investors - but don't assign the project to a task force. At the companies with the very best loyalty credentials, top managers lead the way.

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.

E-Loyalty: Your Secret Weapon on the Web

by Frederick Reichheld and Phil Schefter
Harvard Business Review 7/1/00
In the rush to build Internet businesses, many executives concentrate all their attention on attracting customers rather than retaining them. That's a mistake. The unique economics of e-business make customer loyalty more important than ever.

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.


Learning from Customer Defections
by Frederick F. Reichheld
Harvard Business Review 9/1/96
US corporations lose half their customers every five years. But most managers fail to address that fact head-on by striving to learn why those defectors left. They are making a mistake, because a climbing defection rate is a sign that a business is in trouble. By analyzing the causes of defection, managers can learn how to stem the decline and build a successful enterprise. The longer customers stay with a company, the more they are worth. The key to customer loyalty is value creation. The key to value creation is organizational learning.

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.


Loyalty-Based Management
by Frederick F. Reichheld
Harvard Business Review 3/1/93
Few companies have systematically revamped their operations with customer loyalty in mind. MBNA credit cards and State Farm Insurance are successful because they have designed their business around customer loyalty - a self-reinforcing system in which the company delivers superior value and reinvents cash flows to find and keep customers and employees. When a company consistently delivers superior value and wins customer loyalty, market share and revenues go up and the cost of acquiring new customers goes down. The company then can pay workers better.

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.


Zero Defections: Quality Comes to Service
by Frederick F. Reichheld
Harvard Business Review  9/1/90
Companies that aim for "zero defections" (keeping every customer they can profitably serve) can make profits rise. Defection rates are both a measure of service quality and a guide for achieving it. By listening to the reasons why customers defect, managers know exactly where the company is falling short and where to direct their resources.

The full text of this document is available from Harvard Business Review.


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